TMA’s 100 Greatest Movies of All Time

By
Nov 13th, 2010


You will not like something about this list.  In your mind, undeserving inclusions and unthinkable omissions probably abound.  That is as it should be.  Film, for all the scholarship, expertise and pretense that surrounds it, remains, like all art, firmly subjective.  Feel free to tell us what we missed, what we misplaced, or congratulate us on a job well done, if you feel so inclined.  Just remember to keep it clean, civil and respectful.  With that said, these are The Moving Arts Film Journal’s 100 Greatest Movies of All Time:

#1. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Kubrick)
#2. Citizen Kane (1941, Welles)
#3. The Godfather (1972, Coppola)
#4. Andrei Rublev (1966, Tarkovsky)
#5. The Rules of the Game (1939, Renoir)
#6. Casablanca (1942, Curtiz)
#7. Vertigo (1958, Hitchcock)
#8. La Dolce Vita (1960, Fellini)
#9. Seven Samurai (1954, Kurosawa)
#10. The Godfather Pt. II (1974, Coppola)
#11. The Third Man (1949, Reed)
#12. The Wizard of Oz (1939, Fleming)
#13. Dr. Strangelove (1964, Kubrick)
#14. Goodfellas (1990, Scorsese)
#15. Aguirre: The Wrath of God (1972, Herzog)
#16. 8½ (1963, Fellini)
#17. Singin’ In The Rain (1952, Donen, Kelly)
#18. Raging Bull (1980, Scorsese)
#19. Lawrence of Arabia (1962, Lean)
#20. Solaris (1972, Tarkovsky)
#21. The Night of the Hunter (1955, Laughton)
#22. On the Waterfront (1954, Kazan)
#23. Intolerance (1916, Griffith)
#24. L’Atalante (1934, Vigo)
#25. Apocalypse Now (1979, Coppola)
#26. Birth of a Nation (1915, Griffith)
#27. Battleship Potemkin (1925, Eisenstein)
#28. Taxi Driver (1976, Scorsese)
#29. Chinatown (1974, Polanski)
#30. Rashomon (1950, Kurosawa)
#31. The Searchers (1956, Ford)
#32. The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (1966, Leone)
#33. Yojimbo (1961, Kurosawa)
#34. Nights of Cabiria (1957, Fellini)
#35. The Curse of the Cat People (1944, Fritsch, Wise)
#36. Annie Hall (1977, Allen)
#37. Tokyo Story (1953, Ozu)
#38. M (1931, Lang)
#39. Brief Encounter (1945, Lean)
#40. Rear Window (1954, Hitchcock)
#41. Barry Lyndon (1975, Kubrick)
#42. Ikiru (1952, Kirosawa)
#43. A Clockwork Orange (1971, Kubrick)
#44. Metropolis (1927, Lang)
#45. City Lights (1931, Chaplin)
#46. Bashu, The Little Stranger (1986, Beizai)
#47. A Streetcar Named Desire (1951, Kazan)
#48. Badlands (1973, Malick)
#49. The Asphalt Jungle (1950, Huston)
#50. Pather Panchali (Ray, 1955)
#51. Touch of Evil (1958, Welles, Keller)
#52. The 400 Blows (1959, Truffaut)
#53. The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928, Dreyer)
#54. King Kong (1933, Shoedsack, Cooper)
#55. Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927, Murnau)
#56. L’Avventura (1960, Antonioni)
#57. The Empire Strikes Back (1980, Kirshner)
#58. The Apartment (1960, Wilder)
#59. The General (1927, Keaton, Bruckman)
#60. Pierrot le Fou (1965, Godard)
#61. The Seventh Seal (1957, Bergman)
#62. Talk to Her (2002, Almodóvar)
#63. McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971, Altman)
#64. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962, Ford)
#65. Do the Right Thing (1989, Lee)
#66. Pulp Fiction (1994, Tarantino)
#67. Ugetsu (1953, Mizoguchi)
#68. Manhattan (1979, Allen)
#69. Star Wars (1977, Lucas)
#70. F for Fake (1973, Welles)
#71. Blue Velvet (1986, Lynch)
#72. The Leopard (1963, Visconti)
#73. Modern Times (1936, Chaplin)
#74. Sweet Smell of Success (1957, Mackendrick)
#75. Yi Yi (2000, Yang)
#76. Grand Illusion (1937, Renoir)
#77. Out of the Past (1947, Tourneur)
#78. Mulholland Dr. (2001, Lynch)
#79. Wild Strawberries (1957, Bergman)
#80. Synecdoche, New York (2008, Kaufman)
#81. Psycho (1960, Hitchcock)
#82. Nayakan (1987, Ratnam)
#83. Wings of Desire (1987, Wenders)
#84. The Big Sleep (1946, Hawks)
#85. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004, Gondry)
#86. Ulysses’ Gaze (1995, Angelopoulos)
#87. Notorious (1946, Hitchcock)
#88. Nashville (1975, Altman)
#89. Days of Heaven (1978, Mallick)
#90. The Maltese Falcon (1941, Huston)
#91. The Bicycle Thief (1948, de Sica)
#92. A Touch of Zen (1971, Hu)
#93. Fargo (1996, Coen, Coen)
#94. Breathless (1960, Godard)
#95. Children of Paradise (1945, Carné)
#96. The Wind Will Carry Us (1999, Kiarostami)
#97. Rio Bravo (1959, Hawks)
#98. Jaws (1975, Spielberg)
#99. There Will Be Blood (2007, P.T. Anderson)
#100. Japón (2002, Carlos Reygadas)

A breakdown of the list

Most represented directors (2 or more):
Akira Kurosawa (4), Alfred Hithcock (4), Stanley Kubrick (4), Orson Welles (3), Francis Ford Coppola (3), Martin Scorsese (3), Frederico Fellini (3), Elia Kazan (2), Fritz Lang (2), Woody Allen (2), Jean Renoir (2), John Huston (2), John Ford (2), David Lean (2), David Lynch (2), Terrence Mallick (2), Jean Luc Godard (2), Howard Hawks (2), Charlie Chaplin (2), Robert Altman (2), D.W. Griffith (2)

Most represented decades (10 or more):
1950s (21), 1970s (19), 1960s (14), 1940s (11)

Be sure to check out the other lists in our TMA’s Greatest series:
TMA’s 25 Greatest Horror Movies of All Time
TMA’s 25 Greatest Sports Movies of All Time

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8 comments
TheRealKorbenDallas
TheRealKorbenDallas

If "most represented directors" is supposed to be "2 or more", then why is Tarkovsky not in the list?

Kevin Leon
Kevin Leon

I am glad that many great movies of 2000s like Mulholland Drive , There will be blood, Eternal sunshine of a spotless mind are in this list Mulholland Drive truly deserve to be in top 100. It is one of the best stories in Hollywood cinema and so is There will be blood. The only movies which i missed is "Schindler List" how could they forget to place this masterpiece in their list.

tomd
tomd

rome was delightful... silly... surreal... fun... i still don't get what some critics problems were... it's done very well in most places to audiences seem to like it. 70 million worldwide take

Neill
Neill

I went to see this at an afternoon showing in my local cinema and found the critical mauling I had read to be so inaccurate that my contempt for the bandwagon of movie criticism just shot through the roof. The film is perhaps light but thoroughly enjoyable, a lot wittier than it was given credit for, shining with brilliant Allen dialogue and ludicrous scenarios and quite simply an enjoyable movie.

Jayzaga
Jayzaga

Where is rome open city ? Where is contempt ? Where is the music room ? Where is the great dictator ? Where is sansho the bailiff ? Jaws, starwars, pulp fiction..... u got to be kidding

Annabel
Annabel

Drive is an incredible movie and i recommend it to all ryan gosling fans.

366 Weird Movies
366 Weird Movies

If you're looking for something decent out of Hollywood these days, you have to look at films aimed at children.  The studios seem to realize this is the profitable sector, and that's where they're spending their movie-making capital--not just in terms of visuals but in story, character and dialogue as well.  They seem to have finally perfected the trick of drafting tales that have a dual appeal to kids and adults.  I think HUGO, THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN, THE MUPPETS, RANGO, WINNIE  THE POOH or ARTHUR CHRISTMAS would not look out of place on any critics 2011 top 10 list.

Kurama Hitsugaya
Kurama Hitsugaya

I know this comment is two years old, but Pulp Fiction, Jaws, and Star Wars are all on there.

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